Helpless? Not So. 

While I often feel helpless these past few days, I’ve realized the one thing that I can actually do… And that is to try my absolute best to show these kids how much I value them, in the best way I can, whether it’s teaching them in class or sparing 10 minutes of my time at the end of the school day to review a lesson, spending time with them during lunch or maybe even listening to random stories that they can share. In the end, by doing this, they will know and feel that no decision made is ever easy or simple.

Helpless? Not Me. I can still do things the way I see fit.

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Good Day

Spent a loooooot of time with the kids today….

  • College Application Rush with EJ (Ibang level pero reminds me of my own katamaran. Hihi.)
  • Lunch with Russel
  • Public Speaking Class
  • AP Psych Review Class (Meann has gone mad, I tell you. She’s mad. Teehee.)
  • Game with Badminton Club (Dylan’s gotten so good. So proud!)
  • Dinner with Simon (MITIS graduate)

It’s really all about them kids… nothing else!

All iz well! ❤

Ten on the 10th

I just realized  I hadn’t finished my list… Typical.

Before I end up disparaging myself too much, here goes another (lame) attempt to complete  my list.

Let’s see I’ve managed to give 3 reasons, namely:

  1. Novelty
  2. Numbers
  3. Eustress

What else? Let’s see…

Unpredictability
I never really know what’s going to happen in class. I don’t really know anyone in particular, and they don’t know me. The chances of stepping on someone’s toes are higher, and that makes  it pretty much an exciting endeavor.

Pacing
Having to teach AP has forced me to let go of taking things slow. I always feel a sense of panic whenever I feel like I don’t have enough time to cover all the topics that will come out in an AP exam. In a “regular” class, I have much more confidence to take things slow, though I still blabber most of the time. The funny thing though is that these kids are intense and, for some reason, always feel they need to rush things. I wanna chill… and I don’t mean that in a negative way. I mean it the way Europeans live it… Enjoy each story… Savor each moment…. Breathe…

Challenge
To do something for the first time is always a challenge. Nope, it’s not my first time to teach, but it is my first time to take on this particular grade level (new syllabus, new stories, new everything like I have a lot of time… Am I whining again?). It’s also the first time I teach this batch of kids. They expect much=They expect much of me. That, my dears, is FRIGHTENING!  Who wants to live feeling like they have to pass some sort of test?  Of course, we don’t need to be ruled by such negative thoughts. We only need to be ourselves and let people merge the YOU (they think of) and the YOU (that is). Did that even make sense?

Did you see how I managed to turn a promising happy post to a whining one? This is proof that our conditions affect the way we think. I better stop now before I wreak more havoc upon myself. Heh.

<<<to be continued>>>

 

Puto-Mayapot

It’s been a looong while since I’ve taught a “regular” class. I’m both nervous and excited… Primarily, it makes me feel “normal.”  I don’t really know whether that’s a good or a bad thing, but for now, the change of pace may very well do me some good.

I’ve got 10 students for now in 10th grade on what happebs to be the 10th year of the school. Coincidence? Probably. But, who am I to argue with the opportunity to channel ideas like fate and serendipity?

Whatever the rhyme or reason for this “assignment,” I’ll try to put my own spin of things by giving 10 reasons why this is a win-win situation.

Novelty
I’ve been teaching the same subjects for the last 3 years. Thus, I’ve been reading basically the same literary pieces over and over again. Teaching this “new” class will “force” me to tackle new material, which…

View original post 179 more words

The Masks We Wear

Last Wednesday, the whole class dressed up as stock characters for our lesson on Literary Characterization. But prior to that, upon Ms. Mae’s announcement, it felt a little uncomfortable to dress up and act like that mainly because it’s our first time having this, but of course, firsts are essential. When I saw “jock” on […]

via Jock for a day — Churs & Hugots

Reading this had me wondering (again) why we are so afraid of being true to ourselves. Every day we play a role… perhaps not one that is stereotypical, but a role nonetheless.

We are teacher-motivator, leader-extraordinaire, silent achiever, loser-outsider, know-it-all-geek, etc.  The truth is we can never really be bound by one or two descriptors.  People are (thankfully?) way more complicated than that.

So, why are we so afraid to be ourselves? Because we want to be accepted; we want to feel loved; we want to be appreciated. We do *not* want to be judged. We smile and do our thing, yet deep down, we know we are being measured up to some standard by some random person or, worse, by people we love. How do we know we’re being judged? Simple. We do it, as Charlies pointed out, ALL THE TIME.

The thing about that day was that I was afraid, too. I was afraid the activity would fail. I was worried that it would be a bore. It was, after all, the first time I had tried it. I’ve read about play acting in class so many times, but it’s only now that I found the right feels to try it. Did I just use that word? Ugh.

Did it fail? In many aspects, I felt it did. Was it a bore? Hopefully, NO!  How could it have been boring when I was trying so hard to get into character while seeing the fear in the eyes of my students?

I wonder what they thought of my “insults” towards their “personas.”  In many ways, I’ll have to say I have that inner-bitch-emo-demon in me, which gladly I am able to tame very well… I am able to do so because the inner-optimist-sunshiny-hold-on-no-matter-what side of me always prevails.

That day, the class played a role… a role that was unlike the ones they are used to playing. That day, we all wore masks… masks that we often wear especially when we are afraid.

 

 

Ten on the 10th

It’s been a looong while since I’ve taught a “regular” class. I’m both nervous and excited… Primarily, it makes me feel “normal.”  I don’t really know whether that’s a good or a bad thing, but for now, the change of pace may very well do me some good.

I’ve got 10 students for now in 10th grade on what happebs to be the 10th year of the school. Coincidence? Probably. But, who am I to argue with the opportunity to channel ideas like fate and serendipity?

Whatever the rhyme or reason for this “assignment,” I’ll try to put my own spin of things by giving 10 reasons why this is a win-win situation.

Novelty
I’ve been teaching the same subjects for the last 3 years. Thus, I’ve been reading basically the same literary pieces over and over again. Teaching this “new” class will “force” me to tackle new material, which will result in nothing else but improving myself. More importantly, I get to teach “new” faces. I’ll have the chance to start fresh. I’ve had some initial feedback of how these kids are “nervous” about what’ll happen in our class. Hah! We’ll see if it’s merited. *wink*

Numbers
Though our school takes pride in the fact that we have small teacher-student ratios, there are pitfalls to teaching a class with around only 3 students.  The last time I taught a class with 18 kids was in Public Speaking–the best class I’ve ever had, IMO.  There is strength in numbers. We get more ideas, more options, more help, more, more, more.

Eustress
For some strange reason, I’ve always managed better when stressed. Please let this not be a call for more “problems” but an acknowledgment that some people become more “inspired” when they “have” to accomplish things.  Now that I am teaching 3 classes a day, I will surely, surely, surely, be regularly STRESSED. Will this be a good thing? Who knows. No one knows (Lee, 2014).

<<<to be continued>>>